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New Courses and Program Notes

 

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HIS 482 003 Seminar: Renaissance Venice

Dr. Constance Rousseau
Tuesdays, 2:30-5:00 p.m

This seminar course will investigate Venice’s unique setting located in the sea, the political structure of the republic, its social classes, the family lives of women and men, its civic rituals, and its art and architecture. There will be extensive class discussions, analysis of primary and secondary sources, oral presentations, a research project and videos of Venice. This course is open to juniors and seniors; fulfills a Pre-1715 European History requirement and it also fulfils the ORAL PROFICIENCY requirement!


​DWC 202-C01: Greek Drama and Current Controversies

Dr. John Hennedy, English
Dr. John Lawless, History
TR 2:30-4:20

We propose a colloquium exploring controversies raised in 5th century B.C. E. plays which bear resemblance to controversies present in contemporary American society.  We accept the premise, common to the humanities, that human nature often displays continuity over the ages. The intellectual ferment, crises in beliefs, and political conflicts notably present in Athens re-emerge in areas of our own public experience. Such controversies will produce major categories of conflict which we plan to explore.  Conflict abounds as well both in individual Greek tragedies and comedies featuring clashing perspectives and in divergent perspectives on similar questions among different playwrights.


DWC 202-C02: Our Monsters, Ourselves (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Elizabeth Bridgham, English
Dr. Fred Drogula, History
TR 10:30-12:20

“Our Monsters, Ourselves” will study the development of western thinking about monsters from ancient Greece to modern day. The course will use monsters as a lens though which to study how different cultures imagined ‘the other’, using it to define and distinguish their own cultural norms and boundaries, and how the development of western thinking about monsters reflects changes in western culture itself. Students will read an array of interdisciplinary texts that focus on some kind of monstrosity, including texts drawn from history, literature, philosophy, theology, art and archaeology, anthropology, and folklore. In so doing, they will encounter a wide variety of monsters and will consider the cultural importance of vampires, werewolves, zombies, and even such human monsters as Jack the Ripper. By the end of the course, students will have developed an understanding of what these monsters say about the cultures that created them.


DWC 202-C04: Monsters, Magic, and Mother

Dr. Bryan Freeland, Adjunct Professor, English 
Dr. Sharon Teague, English
TR 8:30-10:20

Having given birth, a mother has the instinct to protect, promote, and provide for her offspring. Western culture, for its part, has constructed images, created myths, and written stories in an attempt to understand—and perhaps even tame—this powerful imperative. There are nurturing earth mothers like Gaia, but also mur-derous Medeas; serene and pure Madonnas, but also women who give birth to mon-sters, aliens, and devils. 
Using a wide range of sources—history, myth, legend, literature, music, and images drawn from art and cinema—this colloquium will explore archetypical representa-tions of motherhood, asking how they continue to affect the way girls (and boys) are raised, influence the assignment of gender roles in families or raise unreasonably high “Supermom” expectations. If it is true that philosophers, psychologists and so-ciologists have now begun to take women's experiences more seriously, especially those centered on motherhood and caring, how may this shape new theories on hu-man nature, morality, and social policy?


DWC 202-C05: Globalization and Authentic Human Development

Dr. Terry McGoldrick, Theology
Dr. David Zalewski, Management
FM 10:30-12:20

This colloquium explores the relationship between globalization and authentic or integral human development – as defined in the Catholic social tradition in light of the modern expansion of a free market economic system. It will survey the revolutionary changes of modern economic history, look at cases in the developing world, environmental difficulties and the positive and negative role of business and finance in human development today. It will consider alternative models inspired by Catholic Social Thought, such as cooperatives, social capital and social entrepreneurs. It will also include a service-learning component.  Varieties of protective responses to the negative consequences of globalization will be analyzed and discussed. The course will also consider environmental ethical perspectives arising from the developing world and community responses as well as United Nations initiatives.  The course will highlight the positive contributions of globalization to authentic human development through the creation of social enterprises, NGO’s micro lending, cooperatives and other institutions designed to alleviate poverty.


DWC 202-C07: Defining the East: Understanding the Origins of 'Orientalism' and its Effects on the Western Worldview

Dr. Vefa Erginbas, History 
Dr. Sandra Keating, Theology
WM 12:30-2:20

In 1978, Edward Said published Orientalism, a book highly critical of what he de-fined as the patronizing and demeaning European view of Arab and Asian cultures. He argues that among the characteristics of the Orientalist perspective is extreme romanticization of the East, as well as imperialist tendencies that claim non-Europeans are in need of civilizing by higher European culture. Although Said's po-sition has been criticized, it is undeniable that Orientalism has had a far-reaching impact on the ways in which political and academic subjects are discussed in con-temporary society. This course will examine Said's position, critiques of it, and evi-dence for both in political, historical, theological, philosophical, and cultural/artistic expressions.

DWC 202-C08: Science and Society

Dr. Joseph Cosgrove, Philosophy
Dr. Alex Moffett, English
MR 12:30-2:20

In our current cultural conversation on education, the sciences and the humanities are often characterized as being completely divergent systems of thought.  However, this seeming separation is an illusion.  There have always been close links between scientific and humanistic discourses, with the humanities often helping to shape the way that scientific and technological developments have been understood in non-scientific circles.  In this class, we will study some of the key scientific discoveries in Western civilization and will consider the ways in which various works of philosophy and liter-ature have responded to those discoveries and considered their implications to society at large.  In doing so, we will acquire a precise comprehension of the scientific theories themselves before studying how the humanities have understood (and sometimes mis-understood) them.  Some of the topics we explore may include the discoveries of Gali-leo, the Scientific Revolution, Newtonian physics, Lyell’s geological theories, Darwin’s theory of natural selection, Einsteinian relativity, and quantum physics.  


DWC 202-C09: Consciousness, God, and Other People

Fr. John Allard, Theology
Dr. Peter Costello, Philosophy
TW 12:30-2:20

The colloquium will consider the phenomenon of human consciousness as the portal for examining the way in which we experience personal presence and its comple-ment, absence.  These experiences (presence and absence), while of special contem-porary interest in the humanities and social sciences, can be traced throughout the cultural traditions of the West and our global society as a whole.  Thus, the course not only will draw material from ancient Greece (Sophocles) and medieval Europe (Aquinas), but also will consider the contribution of East Asian thought (Tulku) to an understanding of consciousness, presence and absence.  The colloquium will be decidedly interdisciplinary in its scope and method:  the humanities will be repre-sented by philosophy, literature, and theology, whereas the social sciences will be represented primarily by psychology and religious studies (as distinct from theology).

DWC 202-C10: Race, Marginality and Theologies of Liberation (repeat of Spring 2014 colloquium)

Dr. Dana Dillon, Theology
Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, History
WM 12:30-2:20

When diverse cultures and people come together, some persons and groups rise to power and find their concerns and interests central, while others are marginalized and oppressed. Both Jewish and Christian scriptures demand attention to the needs and concerns of the poor, the oppressed, and the vulnerable—in other words, those on the margins. This witness echoes through the Christian tradition and has been expressed both in liberation theologies and official Catholic social doctrine as “the preferential option for the poor.” The colloquium will explore both the concept and the reality of marginality in theology and history, with attention to philosophical and literary resources as well. The course will specifically address two case studies of racial marginality: anti-Semitism and African-Americans in the United States. Students will also have the opportunity for research into other cases of racial marginalization.


DWC 202-C11: How to Rule the Future: Can Empathy, Creativity, & Play Lead to Success?

Dr. Jennifer Deren, Visiting Professor, English
Prof. Amisha Patel, Adjunct Professor, English
RM 12:30-2:20

In A Whole New Mind (2006), Daniel Pink argues that Western culture has moved from the “information age” to the “conceptual age,” in which creativity and empathy have become crucial for success in professions previously defined by logic and linear thinking. Although our parents pushed us to become lawyers, accountants, and software engineers, “the future belongs to a very different kind of person,” Pink suggests, “with a very different kind of mind—creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers, and meaning makers. These people—artists, inventors, designers, sto-rytellers, caregivers, consolers, big picture thinkers—will now reap society’s richest rewards and share its greatest joys” (1). This course explores the six human abilities Pink associates with personal and professional success in the new age of conceptual thinking: Design, Story, Symphony, Empathy, Play, and Meaning. Team taught by instructors trained in creative writing, philosophy, and literature, this course offers students pursuing “left-brain” career paths, such as business, law, and computer science, a set of skills typically associated with the arts and humanities. At the same time, the course offers “right-brain” students alternative contexts for applying their creativity and intuition. The course challenges students to become (and remain) conceptual, “big picture thinkers”: inventive, intellectually curious collaborators working towards a happy, healthy, and meaningful future.  


DWC 202-C12: How to Rule the Future: Can Empathy, Creativity, & Play Lead to Success?

Dr. Jennifer Deren, Visiting Professor, English
Prof. Amisha Patel, Adjunct Professor, English
RM 8:30-10:20

In A Whole New Mind (2006), Daniel Pink argues that Western culture has moved from the “information age” to the “conceptual age,” in which creativity and empathy have become crucial for success in professions previously defined by logic and linear thinking. Although our parents pushed us to become lawyers, accountants, and software engineers, “the future belongs to a very different kind of person,” Pink suggests, “with a very different kind of mind—creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers, and meaning makers. These people—artists, inventors, designers, sto-rytellers, caregivers, consolers, big picture thinkers—will now reap society’s richest rewards and share its greatest joys” (1). This course explores the six human abilities Pink associates with personal and professional success in the new age of conceptual thinking: Design, Story, Symphony, Empathy, Play, and Meaning. Team taught by instructors trained in creative writing, philosophy, and literature, this course offers students pursuing “left-brain” career paths, such as business, law, and computer science, a set of skills typically associated with the arts and humanities. At the same time, the course offers “right-brain” students alternative contexts for applying their creativity and intuition. The course challenges students to become (and remain) conceptual, “big picture thinkers”: inventive, intellectually curious collaborators working towards a happy, healthy, and meaningful future.  


DWC 202-C13: The Character of Business: The Ethical Nature of Business and Business Leadership in Their Contemporary Settings

Dr. Timothy Mahoney, Philosophy
Dr. Sylvia Maxfield, Dean of the School of Business 
TR 12:30-2:20

This colloquium aims at showing that genuine business success is best achieved when technical competencies are wedded to fundamental virtues and to an understanding of business in the larger context of society. We will revisit the virtue tradition the students encountered in DWC in Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas and others. We will explore this tradition, especially as it pertains to leadership through both philo-sophical writing and literature.  We will add contributions on virtue and business using the rich material from Catholic Social Thought. We will continue the historical narrative of DWC, but with a special emphasis on developments in business in the context of politics, the economy, and technology.  These works will be our touch-stones as we then turn to recent issues and case in business leadership, both successes and failures, of which there are all too many, we know.


DWC 202-C14: Evolution, Human Nature, and Society (repeat of Spring 2014 and Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Maia Bailey, Biology
Dr. Jeffery Nicholas, Philosophy
TR 2:30-4:20

To what extent does biology determine our lives? Even more, to what extent has the evolution of Homo sapiens sapiens from previous species determined our social forms of life and our individual actions? How has our increasing understanding of how life has evolved changed our way of thinking about science and human life? These questions are grounded in the development of Western science from the early Greeks, some of whom proposed that animals descended from previous forms, through Newton to Darwin and modern biology. Further, the question of the social nature of modern humans remains a perennial question for philosophers, social sci-entists, and biologists. This course will examine current controversies in light of more traditional approaches particularly focusing on the “natural sociality” of the human being, the possibility of free will, and the scientific basis for accepting or rejecting essentialism.



DWC 202-C15: How the Right became the Right: The Origins and Development of Modern American Conservative Thought

Dr. James Keating, Theology
Dr. Patrick Macfarlane, Philosophy
RM 4:30-6:20

This colloquium investigates the political, religious, historical, and cultural background of modern American conservative thought. Because conservatism represents a significant dimension of contemporary politics, and has allied movements in philoso-phy, aesthetics, and religion, we believe that offering such a colloquium will be of great interest and contemporary relevance to our students, and will also serve as a fitting capstone to the first three semesters of DWC. Students will engage with a wide variety of primary texts from the history of American conservative thought. This legacy is quite rich, and encompasses themes beginning with the founding of the American republic and the debates about the ratification of the constitution, outlined in The Federalist Papers, to current issues uniting (and possibly dividing) traditional con-servatives, neoconservatives, and libertarians.


DWC 202-C16: Belief, Religious and Scientific

Fr. Nicanor Austriaco, O.P., Biology
Dr. Colin King, Philosophy
WF 8:30-10:20

It is a truism often cited – at least by the pious – that the truths of religion may be reconciled with those of science. The truism thrives in the largely uninhabited space between two increasingly alienated spheres of discourse: that of scientific explanation and that of religious experience. Part of the problem in relating these two spheres lies in a concept which they supposedly share, the concept of belief. The systems and practices for articulating and justifying beliefs in the religious and scientific contexts differ as fundamentally as laboratory methods differ from theological reasoning. Yet in each of these contexts, the participating members interpret their own practices and explanations as pursuits of truth. What it means for a belief to be true – or even what it means for something to qualify as a belief – differs widely in each of these two cultures. In this course we shall introduce students to a theory of belief for the truth-directed practices in both religion and science, which themselves will be the object of historical study and philosophical analysis.


DWC 202-C18: Music, Beauty, Eros and God (repeat of Spring 2013 and Spring 2014 colloquium)

Dr. Robert Barry, Theology
Dr. Catherine Gordon-Seifert, Music
TR 4:30-6:20

Can music and art express and communicate something eternal and divine? This seminar will explore how philosophy, theology and literature in the Western world have reflected upon “The Beautiful” in music and art, from the ancient world through the modern era, with a special focus on the flowering of the theory and practice of music and art in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This class will culminate in the question today of whether the art and music of our contemporary world can be strive to be anything more than individual self-expression, and what cultural resources the world has available for recapturing and communicating the transcendent and sublime. 


DWC 202-C19: Defining the East: Understanding the Origins of 'Orientalism' and its Effects on the Western Worldview

Dr. Vefa Erginbas, History 
Dr. Sandra Keating, Theology
FM 2:30-4:20

In 1978, Edward Said published Orientalism, a book highly critical of what he de-fined as the patronizing and demeaning European view of Arab and Asian cultures. He argues that among the characteristics of the Orientalist perspective is extreme romanticization of the East, as well as imperialist tendencies that claim non-Europeans are in need of civilizing by higher European culture. Although Said's position has been criticized, it is undeniable that Orientalism has had a far-reaching impact on the ways in which political and academic subjects are discussed in con-temporary society. This course will examine Said's position, critiques of it, and evi-dence for both in political, historical, theological, philosophical, and cultural/artistic expressions.


DWC 202-C20: The Myth of the Warrior (East and West) (repeat of Spring 2013 colloquium)

Dr. Colin Jaundrill, History
Dr. Robert Stretter, English
MR 8:30-10:20

By the end of your third semester in DWC, you will have encountered warriors in a number of different contexts, ranging from their celebration in Homeric epics to the gritty, anti-war stories of the twentieth century. This colloquium invites you to bring these encounters together by thinking critically about the “myth of the warrior,” both in the West and in Asia. In other words, we’ll explore how the ideals associated with warriors were understood in different times and places, as well as how those ideals shape our understanding of war. Some of our subjects—like Greek heroes, medieval knights, holy warriors, and modern American soldiers—might recall topics you’ve dealt with previously in DWC. Other topics—such as women warriors (including the real Chinese story of "Mulan"), the Japanese “way of the samurai,” and warriors in WWII propaganda—will be new territory. Join us for a spirited march through history, literature, philosophy, theology, and art! (Note: This is not a military history class. We will deal primarily with issues of social and cultural significance. If you want to learn about tactics and battlefield decision-making, this isn't the class for you.)


DWC 202-C21: Hooked: The Stories Behind Drug Use In Western Culture​

Dr. Katherine Kranz, Social Work
Dr. Seann Mulcahy, Chemistry
TF 8:30-10:20

This colloquium focuses on addiction as a mechanism for exploring the development of Western culture. The course will be structured around stories of addiction that are based on human experience. We will use philosophical texts, significant works of literature, theological analyses, research in the social sciences, data from scientific experiments, and contemporary art, music, and film to showcase the many voices of drug use throughout history. The colloquium will challenge students to consider questions central to DWC, but focused on a more contemporary topic: How do we define addiction and what causes it? Why do people use drugs? How have drugs been represented or perceived throughout history or in different cultures? Is addic-tion an expression of something wrong with society? How do we treat addiction? What role do politics or economics play in recovery? What roles do race, gender, and class play in drug use? Does the neuroscience of addiction change our view of it? Do theological discussions of drug misuse add to our understanding of it? By ap-proaching addiction from this interdisciplinary perspective, students will be able to see how users of recreational drugs understand the world and how the drugs them-selves have shaped Western culture.


DWC 202.C22: Mythic Afterlives 

Dr. Lynn Curtis, Art and Art History 
Dr. William Hogan, English
FM 12:30-2:20

Archetypal figures and stories from ancient Greek mythology have been deeply in-fluential on the art, music, and thought of the modern West. Mythic figures like Prometheus, Narcissus, Eros, Orpheus, et al, have been imagined and reimagined at different historical moments by poets, composers, painters, and philosophers -- (cf Shelley (both Percy and Mary), Monteverdi, Freud, Nietzsche, and many others). Indeed, these mythic figures have been used to name some of the more powerful im-pulses of modernity, from the 'Promethean' obsession with 'technological progress' to the 'Oedipal' desires that Freud believed structure our psyches, to the deeply 'narcissistic' space of twenty-first century social media. In this colloquium, we will read some of these archetypal mythic stories, discuss how myth works and how it might (should?) be distinguished from other kinds of storytelling, and then trace the 'afterlives' of these myths in their modern cultural manifestations. We will consider what it is about these stories that has made them so compelling in so many historical and cultural contexts.


DWC 202-C23: Democracy in America: Then and Now (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Patrick Breen, History
Dr. Raymond Hain, Philosophy
WM 10:30-12:20

The heart of this course will be a close reading of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, the most important book ever written about democracy in the United States and, perhaps, the most important book ever written about democracy.  We will then ask if Tocqueville’s interpretation of 19th century America helps us under-stand the successes of, and challenges facing, American democracy in the 21st cen-tury.  Along the way we will consider contemporary critics across the political spec-trum and reflect upon the nature of our rights and responsibilities as individual citizens.

  

DWC 202-C24: Contemporary New Orleans and the Arts of Resistance (repeat of Spring 2014 and Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Eric Hirsch, Sociology
Dr. John Scanlan, English
RM 10:30-12:20

As the staggering news of Hurricane Katrina reminded us, poverty and racism, ad-versity and heartbreak, are longstanding problems for the people of New Orleans. The causes of these troubles are deeply imbedded in New Orleans’ unique relation to major themes in Western and American history.  As the Industrial Revolution expanded in the United States in the nineteenth century, New Orleans, formerly a prosperous center of shipping and trade, began to lose ground to the emerging in-dustrial cities. The complex legacy of slavery is perhaps felt especially keenly in New Orleans.  And of course the location of New Orleans has forever made the city vul-nerable to hurricanes.  In short, the sheer scale of poverty, adversity, and racial ine-quality has taken a special toll on the residents of New Orleans. 

How have the people of New Orleans reacted to all this?  How do they fight back?  How do they transform these hardships into lasting works of art, literature, and so-cial capital?  In our view, they have responded by creating distinctive “arts of re-sistance.”   

This course will explore three principal themes where these “arts of resistance” are most conspicuous:  (1) race relations in New Orleans, and particularly matters relat-ing to segregation, desegregation, and re-segregation; (2) the power and persistence of New Orleans music, especially jazz, one of America’s permanent contributions to the arts; and (3) the history and legacy of Hurricane Katrina.  Inevitably, our course will depend on the methods of history, music, sociology, literary studies, and religion, as well as environmental studies and meteorology.

We envision this colloquium as an “immersion” course.  Accordingly, we hope to be able to set up a research trip to New Orleans during Spring Break.


DWC 202-C26: Sustainability: Balancing Profits, People, and the Planet (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Michael Kraten, Accountancy
Dr. Michael Moricas, Military Science
TR 5:30-7:20

Human society and the natural environment possess innate value that should be protected ... but at what economic and financial cost for all of us? We will explore how accountants, environmentalists, investors, politicians, social leaders, and theo-logians balance the goals and practices of capitalism with the need for sustainable lifestyles and ethical practices. We will review the emergence of the sustainability movement, assess its current status, and discuss its future impact from a career de-velopment perspective.

Our activities will encompass reading and writing assignments, discussions, global guest speakers, "gaming" simulations, and field trips to local environmental protec-tion facilities. Case studies will feature domestic and international economic, social, and ecological conflicts. Through the lenses of Christian theology and financial ac-counting, we will explore the choices, the trade-offs, and the relationships between economic and financial wealth, human nature, the grace of God, the desire to enjoy creation, and a livable, protected planet.



DWC 202-C27: How the Right became the Right: The Origins and Development of Modern American Conservative Thought (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. James Keating, Theology
Dr. Patrick MacFarlane, Philosophy
WF 10:30-12:20

This colloquium investigates the political, religious, historical, and cultural back-ground of modern American conservative thought.  Because conservatism represents a significant dimension of contemporary politics, and has allied movements in philosophy, aesthetics, and religion, we believe that offering such a colloquium will be of great interest and contemporary relevance to our students, and will also serve as a fitting capstone to the first three semesters of DWC.  Students will engage with a wide variety of primary texts from the history of American conservative thought.  This legacy is quite rich, and encompasses themes beginning with the founding of the American republic and the debates about the ratification of the constitution, outlined in The Federalist Papers, to current issues uniting (and possibly dividing) traditional conservatives, neoconservatives, and libertarians.


DWC 202-C29: Evil on Stage: Making Sense of Structural Evil in Western Civilization (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Robert Barry, Theology
Dr. Alison Guzman, Modern Languages
TR 10:30-12:20

Through an encounter between drama/ film and theoretical analysis, this colloquium will bring students to confront the problem of structural evil: systems in which people ordinarily operate and intend to pursue the common good, but in doing, so bring about or directly commit grave evils.  We will engage the question of the nature and dynamics of structural evil from two complementary avenues.  First,  students will be exposed to  and analyze artistic depictions from across the spectrum of Western civilization of how people acting in accordance with established social structures and common values end up performing gravely evil actions.   As a result, they will encounter as potential resources for the analysis and remedy of structural evil examples of theoretical reflections on the nature and cause of those same struc-tures depicted in those works of drama, etc.  


DWC 202-C31: Utopia & Dystopia: The Aesthetic and Social Embodiment of Hope 

Dr. Jeffery Nicholas, Philosophy
Dr. Nora Rabins, Studio Art 
W 4:30-6:20; F 12:30-2:20

 
What is our hope for the best world? What is our fear for the worst world? How have these been imagined in art, literature, religion, and philosophy? From the Garden of Eden and early Christian communities to utopian communities of the 19th century, people have sought to embody hope in the best society possible. Artists, too, have sought to capture hope in their different media. Yet, industrialism and tech-nology brought with it fears of a dystopian or inhuman future. From Frankenstein to Dismaland, creative persons develop metaphors of our actual fears. This collo-quium examines these different movements to understand what we have to hope for, what fears most trouble us, and how creative works express other realities. 

DWC 202-C32: Democracy in America: Then and Now (Repeat of Spring 2015 colloquium)

Dr. Patrick Breen, History
Dr. Raymond Hain, Philosophy
TF 10:30-12:20
 
The heart of this course will be a close reading of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, the most important book ever written about democracy in the United States and, perhaps, the most important book ever written about democracy.  We will then ask if Tocqueville’s interpretation of 19th century America helps us under-stand the successes of, and challenges facing, American democracy in the 21st cen-tury.  Along the way we will consider contemporary critics across the political spec-trum and reflect upon the nature of our rights and responsibilities as individual citizens.



 

PROGRAM NOTES

MUSIC

Applied Music - Registration & Fee

These are private lessons taught by an instructor on a one-to-one basis.  Lessons are given once a week and do not count as a fifth course.  There is an additional charge of $570.00 for lessons each semester.  Students must register with the Music Department during the first week of the semester to receive a lesson schedule and be assigned an instructor.  Students who do not register with the Music Department during the first week of the semester cannot be guaranteed lesson space.  If an instrument is unavailable at the College, the student is responsible for its rental fee.  The Department cannot stow most instruments because of space constraints.

Concert Chorale and I Cantori

Concert Chorale is a non-auditioned mixed ensemble open to all students.

Membership in I Cantori is by audition only.  Students wishing to audition for I Cantori must contact Dr. T. J. Harper during the first week of the semester to schedule an audition appointment.

ANTHROPOLOGY

In addition to courses regularly scheduled each semester, there are other opportunities for study of peoples and cultures from an anthropological perspective.  Individual students who would like to take any of the courses listed below, by arrangement and through acceptance of the responsibility entailed in the use of a directed readying format, are invited to contact Sr. Leslie E. Straub, O.P., Coordinator of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, Howley Hall 108, ext. 2517.

APG 301               Art in Everyday Life

APG 303               Sacred Journeys

APG 304               The Built Environment and Spatial Form

​​APG 325               India: Cultural Studies

APG 327               Himalayan Cultural Studies

APG 339               Faith and Healing

APG 360               Prehistoric Archaeology