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New Courses and Program Notes

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Development of Western Civilization Spring 2017 Colloquia

DWC 202-C01: Race, Marginality and Theologies of Liberation  (Repeat of Spring 2014 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Dana Dillon, Theology & Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, History 

When diverse cultures and people come together, some persons and groups rise to power and find their concerns and interests central, while others are marginalized and oppressed. Both Jewish and Christian scriptures demand attention to the needs and concerns of the poor, the oppressed, and the vulnerable—in other words, those on the margins. This witness echoes through the Christian tradition and has been expressed both in liberation theologies and official Catholic social doctrine as “the preferential option for the poor.” This colloquium will explore both the concept and the reality of marginality in theology and history, with attention to philosophical and literary resources as well. The course will specifically address two case studies of racial marginality: anti-Semitism and African-Americans in the United States.
Students will also have the opportunity for research into other cases of racial marginalization.


DWC 202-C02: Our Monsters, Ourselves  (Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Elizabeth Bridgham, English & Dr. Fred Drogula, History

“Our Monsters, Ourselves” will study the development of western thinking about monsters from ancient Greece to modern day. The course will use monsters as a lens though which to study how different cultures imagined ‘the other’, using it to define and distinguish their own cultural norms and boundaries, and how the development of western thinking about monsters reflects changes in western culture itself. Students will read an array of interdisciplinary texts that focus on some kind of monstrosity, including texts drawn from history, literature, philosophy, theology, art and archaeology, anthropology, and folklore. In so doing, they will encounter a wide variety of monsters and will consider the cultural importance of vampires, werewolves, zombies, and even such human monsters as Jack the Ripper. By the end of the course, students will have developed an understanding of what these monsters say about the cultures that created them.

DWC 202-C04: Me, Myself, and I: The Reading and Writing of Autobiography


Dr. Cristina Rodriguez, English & Dr. Alison Espach, English 

How do we write ourselves? This interdisciplinary course will ask students to examine the autobiography from both sides of the page, as authors and as critics. Autobiography as a category insists on identifying the author as the speaker: the class readings will interrogate who gets the privilege to speak for themselves, and how and why writers from different backgrounds—social, religious, ethnic, racial, national—might tell their stories differently. We will also study autobiography’s other major claim: that it’s true. We will examine this claim by asking the following questions: What is literature’s relationship to truth? What is memory’s relationship to truth? What is an individual’s relationship to the truth? And can anything crafted really be true? In addition to studying multiple genres of autobiography, including memoir, personal essay, and autobiographical fiction, we will also practice writing in these genres: students will write and workshop original pieces that imitate an author’s prose style and form. The art of imitation is one practiced by many great thinkers and writers throughout history because there is no better way to engage with the specific choices made by each author. It also gives students the rare opportunity to “try on” a prose style and form as they develop and discover their own. “My Self” is grounded in the belief that reading and writing are acts of self-creation, as well as direct ways of engaging with the world. This course aims to give students the necessary tools to better understand and express their own identity in an increasingly global and complicated world. Authors include St. Augustine, Frederick Douglass, George Orwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Rodriguez, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and others.

This is a practice-based course and extensive writing experience is not a requirement.


DWC 202-C05: Something in the Air: An Element of Western Culture


Prof. Erica Durante & Prof. Eric Parks

Air is the element of life and transcendence, traditionally associated with deities, brightness, spiritual purity, space, and verticality. Anthropologically, our perception of air is related to a vast range of images and spheres that persist and evolve along with human knowledge, progress, and travel. In the course of history, air appears connected to the atmosphere and the weather; to heights, flight, and speed; and to the breath of life—but it is also connected to contagious diseases, pollution, fear, war, and most recently, to the danger of terrorist attacks.

During this colloquium, we will explore the complexity of this natural element by analyzing literary and artistic works of the Western tradition, from Antiquity, with its warning myths of Icarus and Phaethon, to the 21st century—the epoch of aircraft, airports, and global aeromobility.


DWC 202-C06:  The Character of Business: The Ethical Nature of Business and Business Leadership in Their Contemporary Settings (Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Timothy Mahoney, Philosophy & Dr. Sylvia Maxfield, Dean of the School of Business

This colloquium aims at showing that genuine business success is best achieved when technical competencies are wedded to fundamental virtues and to an under-standing of business in the larger context of society. We will revisit the virtue tradition the students encountered in DWC in Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas and others. We will explore this tradition, especially as it pertains to leadership through both philosophical writing and literature. We will add contributions on virtue and business using the rich material from Catholic Social Thought. We will continue the historical narrative of DWC, but with a special emphasis on developments in business in the context of politics, the economy, and technology. These works will be our touch-stones as we then turn to recent issues and case in business leadership, both successes and failures, of which there are all too many, we know.


DWC 202-C07:  Me, Myself, and I: The Reading and Writing of Autobiography


Dr. Cristina Rodriguez, English & Dr. Alison Espach, English

How do we write ourselves? This interdisciplinary course will ask students to examine the autobiography from both sides of the page, as authors and as critics. Autobiography as a category insists on identifying the author as the speaker: the class readings will interrogate who gets the privilege to speak for themselves, and how and why writers from different backgrounds—social, religious, ethnic, racial, national—might tell their stories differently. We will also study autobiography’s other major claim: that it’s true. We will examine this claim by asking the following questions: What is literature’s relationship to truth? What is memory’s relationship to truth? What is an individual’s relationship to the truth? And can anything crafted really be true? In addition to studying multiple genres of autobiography, including memoir, personal essay, and autobiographical fiction, we will also practice writing in these genres: students will write and workshop original pieces that imitate an author’s prose style and form. The art of imitation is one practiced by many great thinkers and writers throughout history because there is no better way to engage with the specific choices made by each author. It also gives students the rare opportunity to “try on” a prose style and form as they develop and discover their own. “My Self” is grounded in the belief that reading and writing are acts of self-creation, as well as direct ways of engaging with the world. This course aims to give students the necessary tools to better understand and express their own identity in an increasingly global and complicated world. Authors include St. Augustine, Frederick Douglass, George Orwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Rodriguez, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and others.

This is a practice-based course and extensive writing experience is not a requirement for this course.


DWC 202-C08: Envisioning Nature


Prof. Lynn Curtis, Art and Art History & Dr. Bruce Graver, English 

"Envisioning Nature" will look at the important role that writers and artists have played in shaping our understanding of nature and the environment.  We will begin with Virgil's great nature poem, the Georgics, and its representation in Renaissance art. From there we will consider several groups of 19th and 20th century writers and painters: Wordsworth, Constable and Turner; Thoreau and the Hudson River School; and John Muir and the preservation of Yosemite, including the role of photographers like Carleton Watkins and Ansel Adams. We will follow through with some 20th century and contemporary writing and art about nature and the environment, including such authors as Rachel Carson and Wendell Berry, and a variety of contemporary artists working directly with and on the land. We will conclude with a consideration of the Appalachian Trail as a unifying line.


DWC 202-C09: Religious Freedom and its Limits: Historical Roots and Contemporary Questions


Dr. Adrian Weimer, History & Dr. Holly Taylor-Coolman, Theology

How does religious freedom function in the context of secular political order?  We will look first at medieval and early modern frameworks for understanding the relationship between church and state. Then we will study the religious and political contexts of the First Amendment to the Constitution, and the various meanings of secularization, as well as the status of religious claims in modern political systems. This knowledge will help us to form a vocabulary for thinking about multiple sides of contemporary issues such as: Immigration, conscience rights for health workers, and religious objections to war.

DWC 202-C10: The Myth of the Warrior (East and West)  (Repeat of Spring 2013, 2014 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Colin Jaundrill, History & Dr. Robert Stretter, English

By the end of your third semester in DWC, you will have encountered warriors in a number of different contexts, ranging from their celebration in Homeric epics to the gritty, anti-war stories of the twentieth century. This colloquium invites you to bring these encounters together by thinking critically about the “myth of the warrior,” both in the West and in Asia. In other words, we’ll explore how the ideals associated with warriors were understood in different times and places, as well as how those ideals shape our understanding of war. Some of our subjects—like Greek heroes, medieval knights, holy warriors, and modern American soldiers—might recall topics you’ve dealt with previously in DWC. Other topics—such as women warriors (including the true Chinese story of "Mulan"), the Japanese “way of the samurai,” and warriors in WWII propaganda—will be new territory. Join us for a spirited march through history, literature, philosophy, theology, and art!

(Note: This is not a military history class. We will deal primarily with issues of social and cultural significance. If you want to learn about tactics and battlefield decision-making, this isn't the class for you.)


DWC 202-C12:  Schemers, Queens, and Nymphos: Western Stereotypes of Women in Power 


Dr. Despina Prassas, Theology & Prof. Eric Parks, English

By the time the course begins, America will have decided whether to elect its first woman president, a woman whose detractors have leveled at her many of the same kinds of charges and complaints faced by real and imaginary women in power throughout the development of western civilization. Against this backdrop, students will explore to what extent these recurring stereotypes may have been accurate representations of women's only means of exercising power in societies that did not always give them a legitimate share in political life, and to what extent they betray the fantasies and fears of (usually) male writers. Texts and works in a variety of genres will range from ancient tragedy, comedy, philosophy and history to the Bible to Game of Thrones to your uncle’s most conspiratorial Facebook posts about Hillary Clinton.


DWC 202-C13: “Love Never Fails”: Grace, Truth, and Freedom in the Nazi Era (Repeat of Spring 2014 and 2015 colloquia)


Dr. Vance G. Morgan, Philosophy & Dr. Raymond Sickinger, History and Public and Community Service Studies

A Polish Franciscan priest. A Lutheran pastor and theologian. A French, Jewish social activist attracted to Marxism. A French novelist and philosopher. A group of young German college students. The citizens of an isolated rural town in France. What do the above persons have in common? In unique and profound ways, Maximillian Kolbe, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Simone Weil, Albert Camus, the members of the White Rose, and the people of Le Chambon were witnesses to the power of the human spirit and the dignity of the human person in the face of unimaginable horror and atrocity. This colloquium will focus on one of the most inhumane periods of Western History--the Era of the Nazi Movement (1930-1945). Yet it will look to voices that spoke to truth and valued authentic freedom in response to the evil and repression of the Nazis. In the voices of the people we will examine in this colloquium the power of love in the face of hatred will be profoundly evident. In exploring the meaning of human existence they will question the easy assumptions and the ideological certainties of the Nazi movement, offering a vision of the human person and the meaning of life not based on the mindless collectivism of the Nazis but rather on the human capacity to love and to suffer for authentic community.


DWC 202-C14: Music, Beauty, Eros and God (Repeat of Spring 2013, 2014, and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Robert Barry, Theology & Dr. Catherine Gordon​, Music

Can music and art express and communicate something eternal and divine? This seminar will explore how philosophy, theology and literature in the Western world have reflected upon “The Beautiful” in music and art, from the ancient world through the modern era, with a special focus on the flowering of the theory and practice of music and art in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This class will culminate in the question today of whether the art and music of our contemporary world can be strive to be anything more than individual self-expression, and what cultural resources the world has available for recapturing and communicating the transcendent and sublime.


DWC 202-C15: The Birth of the New in Art and Literature


Dr. Eric Bennett, English & Prof. Heather McPherson, Art and Art History

Why do modern painters, beginning around 1850, start breaking all the rules?  What relationship is there between French Impressionism and the wild action paintings, the splatters of paint, made by Americans a hundred years later?  How does something like Picasso happen?  When, and for what reason, does art become synonymous with revolution?  What ever happened to traditionalism?  Beauty?  Coherence?  And what are writers—novelists and poets—doing in the years when painters are breaking all the rules?  Are they breaking the rules too?  What historical events and economic and religious shifts stand behind these changes in paintings, sculptures, poems and novels?  How much does contemporary art—the art made yesterday and today in Providence, New York, Berlin, Hong Kong, and elsewhere—have to do with the earlier phases of modernism?  

This colloquium explores the art and literature of the western world and beyond since the middle of the nineteenth century.  It views writing and visual art both as ends in themselves—objects of aesthetic appreciation—and also as signs of how the world has changed with secularization, industrialization and capitalism.  It asks: why does everything have to be NEW all of a sudden? 


DWC 202-C16: Religion and Ritual on Both Sides of the Atlantic


Fr. David T. Orique, History & Fr. James G Sabak, Theology

Building upon the first three semesters of the Development of Western Civilization Program, this interdisciplinary colloquium will examine the development of the Christian religious tradition from a ritual perspective in dialogue with various other cultural and religious practices and its contemporary manifestations in the Atlantic World. Through a theological-historical approach, students will critically study and analyze the influence of selected ritual forms of Christianity and the ritual practices other religious traditions (official and popular) on society from antiquity to today. By the end of this course, students will (1) have a broader understanding of and deeper appreciation for the meaning of religion and ritual as expressed from the ancient Mediterranean world and to the post-modern period; and (2) have the tools to examine rituals in their religious contexts and learn to identify cross-cultural, trans-historical and multi-theological influences.


DWC 202-C18: The History of Sports


Fr. John Vidmar, History & TBA

The course examines Western attitudes towards sport and games since their inception in ancient Greece. It basically Western history. The relationship between Greek philosophic thinking on leisure (Aristotle) and its practice in Greek society in the Olympic Games, how these games affected Roman “games” and the cult of the arena, will be pursued. How did the Roman games differ from the Greek? How did the medieval tournaments develop from Greek and Roman models, and how differ? What role did chivalry play in the medieval games? What does St. Thomas Aquinas say about leisure activities? Further, how did the Reformation, especially Puritanism, threaten the playing of sports (especially on Sunday), and how did authority respond. How did modern sports develop? Interdisciplinary subjects abound: economics, marketing, gender issues, race relations, sports medicine and conditioning, professionalism and amateurism, the revival of the Modern Olympics.

A combination of reading primary texts and listening to a variety of experts in the field (Olympic athletes, trainers, coaches, marketers), viewing contemporary films on sports topics (A League of Their Own, Moneyball, 42, Bull Durham, Angels in the Outfield, A Field of Dreams, etc.) are planned throughout the semester.


DWC 202-C20: Defining Islam: Understanding the Origins of 'Orientalism' and its Effects on the Western Worldview (Repeat of Spring 2016 colloquium)


Dr. Vefa Erginbas, History & Dr. Sandra Keating, Theology 

In 1978, Edward Said published Orientalism, a book highly critical of what he defined as the patronizing and demeaning European view of Arab and Asian cultures. He argues that among the characteristics of the Orientalist perspective is extreme romanticization of the East, as well as imperialist tendencies that claim non- Europeans are in need of civilizing by higher European culture.  Although Said's position has been criticized, it is undeniable that Orientalism has had a far-reaching impact on the ways in which political and academic subjects are discussed in contemporary society. This course will examine Said's position, critiques of it, and evidence for both in political, historical, theological, philosophical, and cultural/artistic expressions.

DWC 202-C21: Rational and Non-Rational Persuasion


Dr. Dan Horne, Marketing, Dr. Colin King, Philosophy, & Dr. Pamela Snodgrass-Belt, Biology

Ordinarily, when we argue with others, we are trying to persuade them of some point. The forms of persuasion are many. We can persuade people by appealing to reasons which are generally accessible and by drawing correct inferences from such generally accessible evidence. This is the paradigm of rational discourse and persuasion. We can also persuade people by threatening them, intimidating them, or appealing to their implicit biases. These are non-rational forms of persuasion and, unfortunately, not uncommon. However, there do seem to be some legitimate forms of non-rational persuasion: eliciting feelings of empathy from an audience might better cause the individuals in it to do the right thing than any amount of “disinterested” argumentation. When is it right to use emotional means to persuade?

In this course we will explore this and related questions by examining how brain function may impact the processing of persuasive information and how pervasive rational and non-rational persuasion speech affects our lives in everything from advertising to politics to jury decisions. The learning objective of our course – taught by a neuroscientist, a marketing professor, and a logician – is to arm students with understanding of the tools of manipulative persuasion, and cultivate practices of fair and effective persuasion (both rational and non-rational).  

DWC 202-C22: Eros, Sex, the Body, and Marriage: The Catholic Approach In Historical Perspective


Dr. Matthew Cuddeback, Philosophy & Dr. Paul Gondreau, Theology

Classical philosophy understands eros as the human yearning for completion and fulfillment. In this colloquium we shall examine the Catholic approach to eros, the body, sex, marriage, and family, in the midst of a contemporary culture that confronts that approach with significant challenges and opportunities. We shall study the philosophical and theological reasoning behind the Catholic approach, and some of its historical literature, art, and music, with sensitivity to the beauty of the human design for love, family, and fulfillment.

DWC 202-C24: Suffering, Wisdom and Creation: The Book of Job and Beyond 


Fr. Thomas McCreesh, Theology & Dr. Robert Reeder, English

The Book of Job, a story of a righteous man’s suffering, is among the most provocative and powerful books in the Bible. Widely considered a masterpiece of ancient world literature, it also raises questions with obvious ongoing relevance: does suffering always have a meaning? Why do terrible things sometimes befall good or innocent people? What does the natural world reveal about the God who (from a Jewish and Christian perspective) created it? Do God and the universe conform to human intuitions about justice? Can suffering lead to unexpected compassion, wisdom and even joy? We will explore these questions through careful reading of the Book of Job itself and through a wide-ranging survey of works inspired by Job, including novels, short fiction, plays, poetry, psychological and theological reflections, visual art, music and film.

DWC 202-C25:  The Ideology of Crisis (Repeat of Spring 2014 colloquium)


Dr. Christine Earley, Accountancy/School of Business & Fr. Gabriel Pivarnik, Theology

This colloquium investigates the way in which crises naturally lead to some sort of coping response.  Response to crises vary, but often crises lead people to turn to beliefs or embrace ideologies that have lasting structural and institutional impacts on society, and often end up exacerbating the effects of the crisis.  In the 1970’s people turned to recycling after the energy crisis; after September 11th, cell phone ownership skyrocketed so that people could always be reached.  In the first three semesters of DWC, students will have investigated how various “isms” and ideologies come to the foreground in the modern area (rationalism, liberalism, nationalism, socialism, etc.). This course will draw on what students have already learned in these areas and will also look to the disciplines of economics and finance, women’s studies and black studies, psychology, global studies, and political science to enhance the traditional DWC disciplines.  Moreover, it seeks to reexamine fundamental questions of the DWC program, like “What does it mean to be human?” by now placing them within the context of “crisis ideology.”

DWC 202-C26: How the Right became the Right: The Origins and Development of Modern American Conservative Thought (Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. James Keating, Theology & Dr. Patrick Macfarlane, Philosophy

This colloquium investigates the political, religious, historical, and cultural back-ground of modern American conservative thought. Because conservatism represents a significant dimension of contemporary politics, and has allied movements in philosophy, aesthetics, and religion, we believe that offering such a colloquium will be of great interest and contemporary relevance to our students, and will also serve as a fit-ting capstone to the first three semesters of DWC. Students will engage with a wide variety of primary texts from the history of American conservative thought. This legacy is quite rich, and encompasses themes beginning with the founding of the American republic and the debates about the ratification of the constitution, outlined in The Federalist Papers, to current issues uniting (and possibly dividing) traditional conservatives, neoconservatives, and libertarians.


DWC 202-C27: Greek Drama and Current Controversies (Repeat of Spring 2016 colloquium)


Dr. Robin Greene, History & Dr. John Lawless, History

This course will explore controversies raised in 5th century B.C.E. plays that bear resemblance to controversies present in contemporary American society. We accept the premise, common to the humanities, that human nature often displays continuity over the ages. The intellectual ferment, crises in beliefs, and political conflicts notably present in Athens re-emerge in areas of our own public experience. Such controversies will produce major categories of conflict which we plan to explore. Conflict abounds as well both in individual Greek tragedies and comedies featuring clashing perspectives and in divergent perspectives on similar questions among different playwrights.


DWC 202-C28: Sustainability: Balancing Profits, People, and the Planet (Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Michael Kraten, Accountancy & Dr. Michael Moricas, Military Science

Human society and the natural environment possess innate value that should be protected ... but at what economic and financial cost for all of us? We will explore how accountants, environmentalists, investors, politicians, social leaders, and theologians balance the goals and practices of capitalism with the need for sustainable lifestyles and ethical practices. We will review the emergence of the sustainability movement, assess its current status, and discuss its future impact from a career development perspective.

Our activities will encompass reading and writing assignments, discussions, global guest speakers, "gaming" simulations, and field trips to local environmental protection facilities. Case studies will feature domestic and international economic, social, and ecological conflicts. Through the lenses of Christian theology and financial ac- counting, we will explore the choices, the trade-offs, and the relationships between economic and financial wealth, human nature, the grace of God, the desire to enjoy creation, and a livable, protected planet.


DWC 202-C29: Science and Society (Repeat of Spring 2016 colloquium)


Dr. Joseph Cosgrove, Philosophy & Dr. Alex Moffett, English

In our current cultural conversation on education, the sciences and the humanities are often characterized as being completely divergent systems of thought. However, this seeming separation is an illusion. There have always been close links between scientific and humanistic discourses, with the humanities often helping to shape the way that scientific and technological developments have been understood in non-scientific circles. In this class, we will study some of the key scientific discoveries in Western civilization and will consider the ways in which various works of philosophy and literature have responded to those discoveries and considered their implications to society at large. In doing so, we will acquire a precise comprehension of the scientific theories themselves before studying how the humanities have understood (and sometimes misunderstood) them. Some of the topics we explore may include the discoveries of Galileo, the Scientific Revolution, Newtonian physics, Lyell’s geological theories, Darwin’s theory of natural selection, Einsteinian relativity, and quantum physics.


DWC 202-C30: Democracy in America: Then and Now (Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. Patrick Breen, History & Dr. Raymond Hain, Philosophy

The heart of this course will be a close reading of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, the most important book ever written about democracy in the United States and, perhaps, the most important book ever written about democracy. We will then ask if Tocqueville’s interpretation of 19th century America helps us under- stand the successes of, and challenges facing, American democracy in the 21st century. Along the way we will consider contemporary critics across the political spectrum and reflect upon the nature of our rights and responsibilities as individual citizens.

DWC 202-C31: God, Consciousness, and Other People (Repeat of Spring 2016 colloquium)


Fr. John Allard, Theology & Dr. Peter Costello, Philosophy

The colloquium will consider the phenomenon of human consciousness as the portal for examining the experience of personal presence and its complement, absence. The experiences of presence and absence are of special contemporary interest in the humanities and social sciences.  They can also be traced throughout the cultural traditions of the West and our global society as a whole. The colloquium will be decidedly interdisciplinary in its scope and method: the humanities will be represented by philosophy, literature, and theology, whereas the social sciences will be represented primarily by psychology and religious studies (as distinct from theology).

DWC 202-C32: Individual, Community, and Media Culture


Dr. Matt Guardino, Political Science & Dr. Jeffery Nicholas, Philosophy 

How does today’s torrent of news, entertainment and advertising shape our conceptions of what it means to be an authentic individual and what it means to live as part of an authentic community? And how might we learn to be more critical analysts of these words and images that bombard us daily, so as to become more accurately informed, philosophically reflective and politically active members of the human community? Questions of community and citizenship, individualism and individuality, have long preoccupied major writers in the Western philosophical tradition. Increasingly, these are also becoming key issues for social scientists and political economists who grapple with how capitalist media has impacted our images of ourselves, our relationships to others, and our sense of human agency. This course is designed to help students understand how media culture (broadly defined) both reflects and shapes individualist and communitarian values, and thus equip them with new tools for critical analysis and civic engagement. As such, this colloquium places a distinctively modern and contemporary twist on very old (and very important) philosophical and political questions of how to construct a just society and to live a moral and fulfilling life. We will teach the course utilizing a Team-Based learning and active learning pedagogy.

DWC 202-C33: How the Right became the Right: The Origins and Development of Modern American Conservative Thought

(Repeat of Spring 2015 and 2016 colloquia)


Dr. James Keating, Theology & Dr. Patrick Macfarlane, Philosophy


This colloquium investigates the political, religious, historical, and cultural back-ground of modern American conservative thought. Because conservatism represents a significant dimension of contemporary politics, and has allied movements in philosophy, aesthetics, and religion, we believe that offering such a colloquium will be of great interest and contemporary relevance to our students, and will also serve as a fit-ting capstone to the first three semesters of DWC. Students will engage with a wide variety of primary texts from the history of American conservative thought. This legacy is quite rich, and encompasses themes beginning with the founding of the American republic and the debates about the ratification of the constitution, outlined in The Federalist Papers, to current issues uniting (and possibly dividing) traditional conservatives, neoconservatives, and libertarians.

​​

HIS 482 002 (CRN 1656) Seminar: Renaissance Vencice

Dr. Constance Rousseau
TUESDAY, 2:30-5:00 p.m.— open to sophomores, juniors  and seniors; fulfills a pre-1715 EUR requirement and ORAL PROFICIENCY

This seminar course will investigate Venice’s unique setting located in the sea, the political structure of the republic, its social classes,
the family lives of women and men, its civic rituals, and its art and architecture.
Extensive class discussions, analysis of primary and secondary sources, oral presentations, research project, videos of Venice, evaluate if Venetian reality challenges or reflects the “MYTH OF VENICE.”
​​




​PROGRAM NOTES

MUSIC

Applied Music - Registration & Fee

These are private lessons taught by an instructor on a one-to-one basis.  Lessons are given once a week and do not count as a fifth course.  There is an additional charge of $570.00 for lessons each semester.  Students must register with the Music Department during the first week of the semester to receive a lesson schedule and be assigned an instructor.  Students who do not register with the Music Department during the first week of the semester cannot be guaranteed lesson space.  If an instrument is unavailable at the College, the student is responsible for its rental fee.  The Department cannot stow most instruments because of space constraints.

Concert Chorale and I Cantori

Concert Chorale is a non-auditioned mixed ensemble open to all students.

Membership in I Cantori is by audition only.  Students wishing to audition for I Cantori must contact Dr. T. J. Harper during the first week of the semester to schedule an audition appointment.

ANTHROPOLOGY

In addition to courses regularly scheduled each semester, there are other opportunities for study of peoples and cultures from an anthropological perspective.  Individual students who would like to take any of the courses listed below, by arrangement and through acceptance of the responsibility entailed in the use of a directed readying format, are invited to contact Sr. Leslie E. Straub, O.P., Coordinator of Anthropology, Department of Sociology, Howley Hall 108, ext. 2517.

APG 301               Art in Everyday Life

APG 303               Sacred Journeys

APG 304               The Built Environment and Spatial Form

​​APG 325               India: Cultural Studies

APG 327               Himalayan Cultural Studies

APG 339               Faith and Healing

APG 360               Prehistoric Archaeology​