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ENGLISH COURSES

ENG 101 - Writing Seminar

1 semester, 3 Credits
Designed for students who require training in the essential skills of writing. Students will master mechanics (grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, correct usage) as well as paragraph organization and essay development. Required course for all those designated as not meeting college-level writing standards.

ENG 161 - Introduction to Journalism
1 semester, 3 Credits
Introduces students to basic journalistic experiences including interviewing, researching, and news, feature, and sports writing. It defines both standards of journalistic writing and the legal standards that govern journalism, and combines lively writing experience with critical awareness. Prerequisite: Intensive Writing Level I Proficiency.

ENG 175 - Introduction to Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
An investigation of the three main literary genres—poetry, fiction, and drama—with an emphasis on writing. Students completing this course should be able to read with engagement and discernment, discuss literature critically, and write analytically and with an awareness of scholarly conversations. Required for English majors.

ENG 201 - Readings in Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Offered specifically for non-English majors who wish to cultivate their enjoyment of literature. Students read and write about a variety of works focusing on themes such as money and power in literature, fallen heroes, or the tragic dilemma.

ENG 204 - Literary Journalism
1 semester, 3 Credits
A plus on any résumé, magazine journalism gives students practical hands-on experience editing and publishing a literary journal. We will solicit and edit work, design and help produce The Alembic. Students will read literary texts in several genres within a critical context and formulate, discuss, and develop sophistication in critical issues. Comparative essays, close readings, and book reviews will all be part of the course.

ENG 231 - Survey of British Literature I
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course is an intensive survey of English literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings through the 18th century.  The course traces the rise of the English language as a vehicle for literary art and emphasizes historical development of literary genres.

ENG 232 - Survey of British Literature II
1 semester, 3 Credits
This is an intensive survey of English literature from Romanticism to Modernism. The course emphasizes the development of a specific British literary tradition, manifested in a variety of literary genres.

ENG 285 - Introduction to Creative Writing
1 semester, 3 Credits
Introduction to Creative Writing in fiction and poetry for Creative Writing majors and other interested students. Classes discuss reading and writing assignments in seminar and workshop settings. Students keep reading journals, write substantive critiques of each other’s work, a book review on poetry or fiction, and assemble a portfolio of their work including nine poems and three short stories, all with two to four revisions.

ENG 301 - Intermediate Writing
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course emphasizes argumentative writing. Students will write and discuss essays in order to master the art of persuasion. Considerable attention will also be given to matters of style and organization. Prerequisite: Intensive Writing Level I proficiency.

ENG 304 - History of the English Language
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course examines the historical and linguistic development of the English language as revealed through selected literary texts from the Middle Ages to the present. We will examine the technical aspects of language (semantics, syntax, phonology), as well as larger literary concerns.

ENG 305 - Medieval Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Varies in organization: sometimes concentrates on a major genre (Romance, Drama, Dream Vision); sometimes surveys the period (Beowulf to Malory); sometimes focuses on the richness of the last quarter of the 14th century (Gawain-Poet, Chaucer, Langland).

ENG 307 - Chaucer
1 semester, 3 Credits
Concentrates on Chaucer’s major work, The Canterbury Tales, from multiple perspectives: linguistic, historic, comparative, and iconographic. The Tales are read in Middle English but no previous experience with that language is required.

ENG 308 - Sixteenth-Century Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Surrey, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Drayton. The course may include prose romances, especially Sidney’s Arcadia.

ENG 310 - Milton
1 semester, 3 Credits
Samples Milton’s works from his early poetry on, culminating in his great epic, Paradise Lost. The focus is on Milton’s ability to create moving experiences in his verse, as well as his original concerns about 17th-century English culture.

ENG 311  - Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course concentrates on Shakespeare’s early plays, primarily comedies and histories, with close analysis of the texts in the light of relevant political, social, and cultural contexts, and with some attention to stage history and film productions.

ENG 312 - Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course concentrates on Shakespeare’s later plays, primarily tragedies and romances (or tragic-comedies), with close analysis of the texts in the light of relevant political, social, and cultural contexts, and with some attention to stage history and film productions. 

ENG 313 - Renaissance Drama
1 semester, 3 Credits
Surveys non-Shakespearean drama from 1585-1700. Authors include Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, Wycherly, and Congreve. The plays are read against the invigorating and turbulent political era that shaped modern England.

ENG 314 - Spenser
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course provides us with the universe according to the great allegorist of Elizabethan England, Edmund Spenser. He is placed within the context of authors whom he quarried (Vergil, Ovid, Petrarch, Ariosto, Tasso, Castiglione, Sidney; two or three of these will be studied each semester) to construct his monumental poem The Faerie Queene. We will read that poem in its entirety.

ENG 317 - Seventeenth-Century Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores three remarkable eras of British literature: the late Renaissance (1600-1642), the Interregnum (1642-1660), and the Restoration (1660-1700). The literary works of this century are as magnificent and eclectic as the culture they reflect, popularizing and refining such genres as the play, the novel, the epic, the lyric, the masque, the essay, the newspaper, and the joke book.

ENG 320 - Early American Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Examines early American texts, particularly the literature of colonial New England. Inquires how early New World encounters, as recorded and interpreted in the era’s autobiographical and other writings, shaped the lives and identities of Native Americans, conquerors, settlers, slaves, and post-Revolutionary Americans. Topics include the impact of emerging print culture on the development of American democracy. Same as AMS 320.

ENG 321 - Age of Satire
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores a range of works published during the Restoration and early 18th century, but concentrates on satire. We shall consider the works of major and minor writers, including Dryden, Rochester, Defoe, Swift, Pope, and Fielding.

ENG 322 - Age of Johnson
1 semester, 3 Credits
Examines changes in the definition, use, and manufacturing of literature that took place from roughly 1745 to 1800.We shall consider the works of major and minor writers, including Fielding, Gray, Sterne, Blackstone, Gibbon, Boswell, and Burns. Special attention will be paid to the writings of Samuel Johnson.

ENG 351 - Romantic Age
1 semester, 3 Credits
From semester to semester, Romantic Age has different thematic emphases, such as Romanticism and Nature, Romantic Representations of Women, Romanticism and Revolution, and Romantic Ballad and Song. The reading list may include Austen, Baillie, Blake, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Scott, Mary and Percy Shelley, Wollstonecraft, and Wordsworth.

ENG 353 - The Victorian Age
1 semester, 3 Credits
Social reform, shifting perceptions of religion and science, expanding empires, and aesthetic experimentation defined the Victorians and produced new literary genres. Thematic emphasis of this course varies but always connects Victorian literature and its social context. Authors combine the canonical (Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, Wilde) with pioneers of sci fi, detective fiction, and children’s literature (Wells, Conan Doyle, Carroll, etc.).

ENG 354 - Nineteenth-Century British Novel
1 semester, 3 Credits
Focuses on 19th-century novels in a variety of styles: realistic, Gothic, sensationalistic, comic, and horror. Students will investigate how these novels fit, develop, or disrupt novelistic conventions and social expectations of their day, particularly those concerning social class, gender roles, and imperialistic British nationality. Major authors may include Austen, Dickens, Eliot, the Brontës, Trollope, Collins, and Stoker. Same as WMS 354.

ENG 355 - American Literature to 1865
1 semester, 3 Credits
Concentrates on the period of the American Renaissance (1836-1860), with some attention to earlier writings. Authors include Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Cooper, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman. The central topic is the variety of responses to the question of American democratic opportunity.

ENG 356 - American Literature 1865 - 1914
1 semester, 3 Credits
Surveys American literature through some of the most difficult years in our history, the years of industrialization and urbanization. Major authors include Twain, James, Dickinson, Crane, Robinson, Wharton, Frost, and Adams. Some regionalist and naturalist works are also read.

ENG 357 - Modern Drama
1 semester, 3 Credits
A survey of drama including authors such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Wilde, Chekhov, Lorca, Yeats, Giraudoux, O’Neill, Pirandello, Albee, Miller, and Williams. The course explores the development of drama in its social, political, and psychological contexts.

ENG 358/ENG 359 - Communications Internship
1 semester, 3 Credits
Juniors and seniors may obtain internships at local businesses and agencies to develop and apply skills in writing and analysis, in the workplace. In addition to the 10-15 hours per week of supervised experience, students must compose and fulfill a contractual learning agreement. Pass/Fail credit only. 

ENG 360 - Modern Irish Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
A survey of Irish literature from 1880 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the Literary Revival (1880-1940). Authors include Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O’Casey, Lady Gregory, O’Faolain, O’Connor, O’Flaherty, Beckett, Bowen, Heaney, and Friel. Topics include the appeal of the past, literature and politics, the formation of a new Ireland, and the problem of violence.

ENG 363 - Twentieth-Century British Novel
1 semester, 3 Credits
Surveys the pre-World War I period, the inter-war years, and the post-1945 period.  Authors include Conrad, Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Forster, Woolf, Greene, Ford, Orwell, Waugh, Burgess, and others.  Occasionally, non-British works are included.  Topics for discussion range from the modernist revolt and the age of crisis, to the tensions between tradition and change.

ENG 364 - Modern American Fiction
1 semester, 3 Credits
Covers American fiction since World War I.  Authors include Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Cather, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Welty, O’Connor, Salinger, Heller, Percy, Pynchon, Morrison, and Fellow.  Topics for discussion include the search for identity through tradition, the disillusionment of the ’30s, the Southern Renaissance, and the problematics of mass society. Crosslisted with:  AMS 364-001

ENG 365 - Twentieth-Century African American Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
A reading-intensive introduction to 20th-century African-American fiction, autobiography, drama, and poetry, with particular attention to social and cultural contexts. Writers include Nella Larsen, Ralph Ellison, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, John Edgar Wideman, and Anna Deavere Smith.  Focus on race, class, and gender, and on the authors' approaches to the role of literary arts in society.  Fulfills the Core Curriculum’s Writing II and Diversity proficiencies.  Crosslisted with:  BLS 365-001 and AMS 365-001

ENG 366 - Developments in Twentieth-Century Fiction
1 semester, 3 Credits
The focus is high Modernist prose fiction—Joyce, Proust, Stein, Woolf, Beckett, and others—with a glance at the predecessors—Balzac and Flaubert—and at the post-Modern followers.

ENG 368 - Twentieth-Century American Drama
1 semester, 3 Credits
Surveys American drama from O’Neill to the present. Dramatists include O’Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, Hellman, Wilder, and others.

ENG 369 - Women in Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores great works of fiction, poetry, and drama by women. Critical analysis of literature considers differing forms of literary criticism, including psychoanalytical theory, feminist theory, Marxist criticism, and historicism. Emphasis on the analytical categories of gender, class, race, ethnicity, age, physical condition of writers, and the societies they depict. Victorian to Contemporary writers. Same as WMS 369.

ENG 370 - Global and Postcolonial Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Examines contemporary global and postcolonial literature. Focuses on novels and short stories from countries and regions that were formerly part of the British Empire, with an emphasis on Anglophone Caribbean, African, and Indian fiction. Key themes: globalization; the effects of colonization and decolonization on the identities of the decolonized; and migration, exile, diaspora, displacement, and belonging.

ENG 371 - Contemporary Poetry
1 semester, 3 Credits
A study of poets in the English-speaking world from about 1940 to present. Auden, Thomas, Lowell, Plath, Bly, Levertov, Heaney, Kinnell, Brooks, Olson, Creeley, and Walcott are representative of the new post-Modernism, a definition of which is still evolving.  

ENG 372 - Contemporary Drama
1 semester, 3 Credits
A survey of drama from 1960 to the present. Emphasizes the relationship between the theater and national identity, and discusses how issues involving race, gender, language, and culture are represented in plays from a variety of nations.

ENG 373 - U.S. Fiction Since 1960
1 semester, 3 Credits
The focus is on prominent writing done or recognized in this period with attention to the infection of nonfiction with fictional techniques and the “democratization” of the term literature to include sci-fi, mystery, reportorial writing, and the wide range of ethnic and gender concerns.

ENG 380 - Creative Writing in Fiction
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course helps students learn to write short stories. Exercises are designed to strengthen students’ skill in rendering the elements of fiction. All work is discussed in a workshop situation. An anthology of short stories is read along with students’ work. A folio of exercises, short stories, and revisions provides the basis for the course grade.

ENG 381 - Creative Writing: Poetry
1 semester, 3 Credits
This course helps students learn to write poetry.  Exercises are designed to sharpen students’ skill in rendering the elements of poetry. All work is discussed in a workshop situation. An anthology of poetry is read along with student work. A folio of exercises, poems, and revisions provides the basis for the course grade.

ENG 385 - Advanced Writing
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores the art of the essay by reading selected works of major essayists, analyzing carefully their prose style, and using their works as models for imitation. By semester’s end, students will write original essays that demonstrate their control of the essay form, and their understanding of various techniques of prose style. Prerequisite: Intensive Writing Level I Proficiency.

ENG 400 - Literary Criticism and Theory
1 semester, 3 Credits
An intensive examination of major works of literary criticism, from Plato to the present. Students will learn to write theoretically about literature and will be asked to apply specific critical methods to literary works. Readings may include Plato, Aristotle, Coleridge, Nietzsche, Freud, Derrida, Foucault, Nussbaum, and Cixous. Prerequisite for students writing a senior thesis.

ENG 440 - Studies in Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores special topics not covered in regular offerings; may not be repeated from year to year. The following Studies in Literature topics have been offered recently: Nature and the Arts, 18th-Century Novel, Medieval Romance, and Law and Literature.

ENG 441 - Studies in Literature
1 semester, 3 Credits
Explores special topics not covered in regular offerings; may not be repeated from year to year. The following Studies in Literature topics have been offered recently: Comedy in American Poetry, Holocaust Literature, and Romantic Novel.

ENG 442 - Seminar: The Prose Poem
1 semester, 3 Credits
Designed to be both a literature and a creative writing course. Introduces students to prose poetry, and traces the development of its tradition both here and abroad. Scrutinizes this hybrid form and traces its enigmatic history. Students will also write some prose poems.

ENG 460/ENG 461 - Tutorials
1 semester, 3 Credits
Tutorials provide individualized, independent study of a particular concept, topic, theme, or author, as well as advanced creative and/or expository writing. The student and instructor agree upon a mutual area of interest, the direction of study, and the nature and frequency of the meetings.

ENG 480/ENG 481 - Seminars
1 semester, 3 Credits
Seminars explore intensively a selected literary concept, genre, topic, or author. Classes are small in size and offer students the opportunity for oral presentations, leadership of class discussion, and a major research project. Recent seminar topics include Wordsworth, Literature of Spiritual Crisis, The Prose Poem, Women and Slavery, Yeats and Joyce, and New York Avant-Garde.

ENG 488 - Seminar: Poetry Capstone
1 semester, 3 Credits
Students will synthesize what they have learned in their previous English and Creative Writing courses, and write a final critical/craft paper and a portfolio that reflect this synthesis. Classes will concentrate on close readings of assigned poetry and workshops. Students will present oral reports on three contemporary poets of their choice. Prerequisite: ENG 381.

ENG 489 - Seminar: Fiction Capstone
1 semester, 3 Credits

Students will synthesize what they have learned in their previous English and Creative Writing courses, and write a final critical/craft paper and a portfolio that reflect this synthesis. Classes will concentrate on close readings of assigned fiction and workshops. Students will present oral reports on three stories of their choice.

ENG 490 - Independent Study
1 semester, 3 Credits

ENG 498/ENG 499 - Senior Thesis
1 semester, 3 Credits
Designed for seniors wishing to undertake a significant research project. Students work with a faculty advisor who will guide them from the planning stages of the thesis to its completion. A written proposal must be approved by a faculty advisor and department chair before registering. The thesis will be evaluated by the advisor and a second reader. Prerequisite: ENG 400.

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The Department of English is located in the Ruane Center for the Humanities, LL37. Office hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. For more information, email engdept@providence.edu or contact the following people.

Chair
Dr. Bruce E. Graver
Ruane LL33          
401-865-2053
beg@providence.edu 

Assistant Chair
Dr. Margaret Reid
Ruane LL32
401-865-2689
mreid@providence.edu

Adminstrative Assistant
Janet Masso
401-865-2292
401-865-1192 [Fax]
jmasso@providence.edu

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